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I noticed a woman of 51 with failed implants posted a question which was answered in...

Q:

I noticed a woman of 51 with failed implants posted a question which was answered in part. She asked a number of questions, but only some were addressed. I myself am interested in her questions which are:

1. Are tear-shaped implants suitable for partial sub-muscular insertion?

2. Can implants, if in good condition, be re-used?

3. How many times can your breasts be operated on - or in other words, is the risk the same each time?

A:

I didn't see the earlier post, but here are some thoughts on your questions. The form-stable ("gummy bear") teardrop implants are currently not available in the U.S. as they are not FDA-cleared.  However, what I hear from the clinical investigators and colleagues in other countries is that they are suitable for specific breast shape issues, about 15% of all augmentation patients overall.  Where or not they go partially under is not one of the primary considerations.  In terms of the second question, the FDA labeling for implants is for single-use.  The third question is a bit tricky.  Sometimes patients get caught in a series of re-operations for certain problems, and the risk of subsequent problems is higher with each one.  In other words, the biggest predictor of a problem requiring re-operation is a re-operation.  This can be offset to some degree by waiting an adequate period of time for healing between operations, typically 6 months or more.

Richard A. Baxter, M.D.
Mountlake Terrace, WA

A:

1. For me, tear drop implants do not provide any advantage over standard round implants and therefore I do not use them. 

2.  Implants can be re-used at the time of surgical correction, but sometimes it is better to replace them with newer implants

3.  There is no limit to the amount of times a breast can be operated on.  However, multiple surgeries create more scar formation and make it difficult for the surgeon to get 100% of what he/she wants to achieve.  It is also an indicator that you may have a problem which is not totally correctable.

Dr. Costanzo Thousand Oaks, CA. 91360 www.doctorcostanzo.com

 

A:

In attempting to answer your questions, it would be important to have an idea of which implant you are referring to as a teardrop implant.  Also, I am assuming you are talking about "subpectoral" placement (Under the pectoralis muscle).  In general, shaped implants are suitable for "subpectoral" placement.

Concerning the second part of your question, in general, I would not re-use an implant and for more than one reason.  One important reason revolves around the fact that all implants will eventually fail. Why use an implant that may have a decreased life-expectancy?  This may create a situation where your next operation is sooner than if new implants were used.

Finally, I do not know that there is a number of times that re-operation on a breast is possible.  I believe there are many factors involved in answering this question; one of the most important factors in making a decision would be the reason that re-operation is required.  If the reason is a "broken" implant, I do not know there is a limit.

 

A:

In attempting to answer your questions, it would be important to have an idea of which implant you are referring to as a teardrop implant.  Also, I am assuming you are talking about "subpectoral" placement (Under the pectoralis muscle). In general, shaped implants are suitable for "subpectoral" placement.

Concerning the second part of your question, in general, I would not re-use an implant and for more than one reason.  One important reason revolves around the fact that all implants will eventually fail.  Why use an implant that may have a decreased life-expectancy?  This may create a situation where your next operation is sooner than if new implants were used.

Finally, I do not know that there is a number of times that re-operation on a breast is possible.  I believe there are many factors involved in answering this question; one of the most important factor in making a decision would be the reason that re-operation is required.  If the reason is a "broken" implant, I do not know there is a limit.

 

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