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I want to have breast augmentation surgery. How long before the procedure do I have...

Q:

I want to have breast augmentation surgery. How long before the procedure do I have to stop smoking?

A:

Smoking interferes with wound healing.

We require our patients to stop smoking three weeks before surgery and three weeks after surgery.  Avoid second hand smoke.  This is for your safety - do not take any risks.

 

A:

As I say to my patients, quit smoking for your health but for surgery, smoking interferes with skin healing, so I ask them to quit 2 weeks before for incisions under the breast and 2-3 months before for visible scars like on the nipple areola or armpit. http://www.casas.md/index.php/breast-augmentation/

A:

 for a breast augmentation, there usually is not a problem with skin healing, but we worry about your lungs during anesthesia.

I recommend at least 2-4 weeks without smoking before surgery, and a similar period after surgery.

Regards,

Navin Singh

A:

I recommend stopping 2 weeks before the surgery. Remember, it is Nicotine that causes the problems, so you should also stop using the nicotene patch, Nicorette gum, etc. before surgery.

William H. Gorman, M.D. - View Other Answers by this Doctor
Austin, TX

A:

I can’t stress it enough: A cigarette habit greatly compromises healing. Smoking damages skin, keeps incisions from repairing and worsens scarring. Moreover, nicotine, which gets into the bloodstream, can cause blood clots. Smoking triggers the release of skin-damaging free radicals, increases swelling, worsens scarring, and impedes healing by limiting blood flow to the skin.

If you smoke, you should refrain for at least two weeks before your procedure and two weeks after. I’d far prefer it, of course, if you started cutting back well before that two-week mark. It’s a bad idea to be smoking regularly before you have surgery, and an even worse idea after.

 

A:

I am not aware of specific studies that show an increased risk of complications in smokers who have a breast augmentation. There is for other plastic surgery procedures such as breast reduction and facelift. 

The problem that causes risks and complications is not smoking itself but the nicotine in the system that can come from other sources such as nicotine gum or chewing tobacco. 

It makes sense to have everything going for you if you are electing to have a cosmetic surgical procedure. The consensus seems to be that you should have no nicotine in your system for two weeks before the procedure to allow it to clear the system and two weeks after the procedure in order to heal. 

Scott Replogle, M.D., FACS - View Other Answers by this Doctor
Louisville, CO

A:

I can’t stress it enough: A cigarette habit greatly compromises healing. Smoking damages skin, keeps incisions from repairing and worsens scarring. Moreover, nicotine, which gets into the bloodstream, can cause blood clots. Smoking triggers the release of skin-damaging free radicals, increases swelling, worsens scarring, and impedes healing by limiting blood flow to the skin.

If you smoke, you should refrain for at least two weeks before your procedure and two weeks after. I’d far prefer it, of course, if you started cutting back well before that two-week mark. It’s a bad idea to be smoking regularly before you have surgery, and an even worse idea after.

 

A:

There are certain procedures where stopping smoking is required due to the effects of nicotine.  These include abdominoplasty (tummy tuck), mastopexy (breast lift), and facelift.  Because nicotine constricts blood vessels, when the tissues are undermined and pulled tight they are more vulnerable to reduction of blood flow.  However, with breast augmentation alone, the issue is not as critical so recommendations about quitting vary between different surgeons.

Richard A. Baxter, M.D. - View Other Answers by this Doctor
Mountlake Terrace, WA

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