Submit your question below about any cosmetic procedure to be considered for posting with an answer from one of our board-certified plastic surgeons.

If your question is about the cost of a procedure, click here. For referral to a qualified surgeon in your area, see find a surgeon.

Note: ASAPS cannot give advice about specific medical problems nor should answers provided by responding surgeons be substituted for a complete medical history, work-up and an in-personal medical/surgical consultation. Sorry we can't answer all questions. We try to select questions that have the widest general interest.

Is my physician correct in how much breast tissue she will remove for a breast reduction?

Q:

My doctor wants to remove 400 grams of breast tissue; however my insurance will only cover the procedure  if she takes 470 grams off.  I talked to my physician and she won't change what she will take. She didn't measure me during my visit, she just took a picture and asked for my bra size weight and height. My height is 5'7' and my weight about 163 lbs.  I'm going  to another doctor to get second opinion. Is my physician correct in how much breast tissue she will remove?

A:

You need to understand that the amount of weight that insurance companies demand to be taken to qualify for coverage is arbitrary, non scientific and has no basis.

When a plastic surgeon does a reduction mammoplasty, none will be able to give an exact to the gram number that they are able to take out. The surgeon need to perform the surgery safely, so that the blood supply to the nipple is left intact and the blood supply to the rest of the tissue and skin is also enough to minimize the risk of fat necrosis and  skin loss. Also the surgeon has to take in consideration what the patients desires as far as the ultimate size. Taking too much to satisfy the insurance company will leave you with small breast size that you may be unhappy with. Taking too little breast tissue leave you with larger than desired size and requires another surgery!!

Related Questions

Copyright © 2009-2012 ASAPS. All Rights Reserved.