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I had surgery done for an umbilical hernia, but after the surgery which has been...

Q:

I had surgery done for an umbilical hernia, but after the surgery which has been about a year and two months I am experiencing discomfort due to the non-dissolved stitches that were used inside to stitch me. I was told I could have them taken out after a year but my other concern is the aesthetics of the surgery. I was left with a horizontal surgical scar about an inch long and no belly button. There is also hardening on the inside where the internal stitching was done. My question is after the internal stitches are removed, is it possible to have an innie belly button reconstructed? I was told by the surgeon who performed the surgery that the original naval hole is still there. What can I expect from a reconstructive surgery?

A:

It is very difficult to answer your question without an examination. Have a consultation with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and discuss your options.

It seems to me now that your major problem is the internal sutures.  The new umbilicu will be an "innie."

A:

Making a new Belly Button (or Neoumbilicoplasty) can be extremely difficult and challenging surgical sculpture. Options depend on the original problem, what was done, how you healed, scarring, and many other factors best explored during a consultation.

Sometimes the operation can be a simple as an Outie to Innie Belly Button Reconstruction with surgery restricted to the belly button itself.

For some, this surgery can involve a compromise such as in this patient unhappy with her non existing belly button after a failed attempt of a MiniTuck to tighten her loose skin at the belly button itself. She then had an attempt at a belly button revision. She then had a burn scar injuring tissue above the belly button. She needed a Tummy Tuck Revision with a small component low vertical scar.

This is a challenging art form. Look for before and after examples of your surgeon's work before agreeing to surgery.

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, M.D. Board Certified American Board of Plastic Surgery

Learn more about Umbilicoplasty Belly Button Plastic Surgery.

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