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As a Type I diabetic for over 20 years, is it safe for me to have a Tummy Tuck now?

Q:

Hi,

I'm a Type I diabetic for over 20 years now. I am 36 years old, 5'2", and weigh 150 pounds.  I have two sons and my belly is not as it was before.  I have a lot of skin that hangs down a bit. I've lost some weight but do not notice any changes around my lower belly area.  With my pregnancies I had high blood pressure and have been taking medication for Hypertension (my A1C is 6.5). I was wondering if it's safe for me to have a tummy tuck and what the results may be.

A:

Yes, it is safe for you to have a Tummy Tuck as long as certain precautions are taken at the time of your surgery. First, your glucose will need to be managed well in the peri-operaitive period . This most likely will necessitate an overnight stay at a facility capable of managing Diabetic patients.

May I suggest you start with your primary care physician and request recommendations for your medications and surgery. They may do an EKG. Next, consider one of the many members of the ASAPS that has an overnight care facility capable of managing your diabetes or can perform your procedure in a hospital setting.

Best,

Gary R Culbertson, MD, FACS

A:

It is safe for you to have a tummy tuck as long as your diabetes and blood pressure are well controlled before, during and after surgery. You should consult with your primary care physician to be evaluated and to make sure your health is optimal before having elective surgery. Then, consult with a board certified plastic surgeon about the procedure, risks in someone with your medical history, and the recovery process involved with the procedure(s) you desire if you decide to move forward.

Todd Case, MD

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