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My doctor who routinely mixes his Botox with 1 cc of saline is now changing to 2.5 cc...

Q:

My doctor who routinely mixes his Botox with 1 cc of saline is now changing to 2.5 cc of saline. He says the 2.5 cc is a newer method. Can I still continue to have him inject between my brows, forehead, brow lift, under and around the eyes, nose and chin? I'm worried.

A:

Why not?   this is a recomended mixture ratio.  I have used the 2.5cc amount for about 15 years and it works just fine.  In fact, I recommend to everyone I teach that they use the same routine. 

A:

The amount of saline used to dilute the medication is not important; what is important is the number of units he uses per area.  You should ask your physician that question. Some injectors prefer to dilute the medication to have a more accurate delivery of the medication per area (the lines in the syringe are pretty small, so for some doctors it is difficult to see how many lines are injected). The only problem with injecting more fluid into each area is that the medication can diffuse a little more (i.e. maybe increasing possible side effects).

The bottom line, you need to talk to your Doctor and he/she should be able to explain the reasons for the change.  I personally prefer to use a 1cc per 100 units.

Good Luck

Victor M. Perez, M.D. - View Other Answers by this Doctor
Overland, KS

A:

Diluting Botox with 2.5cc of saline is one of the most common dilutions for cosmetic uses, however, the dilution is not really important in the administration of Botox. The total number of units of Botox injected into an area is what will primarily determine the effect of the Botox. A common dosage of Botox for the glabellar area (between the eyebrows) is 20 units divided over 5 injections. If the Botox is diluted with 2.5cc then at each site 0.1cc of Botox would be injected. To achieve the same dosage with a Botox dilution of only 1.0cc would require injections of 0.04cc at each of the 5 sites. With the way syringes are designed, it is actually easier to more precisely inject 0.1cc than 0.04cc. In the end the dilution is not the critical factor. What is important is the number of units of Botox injected.

www.drnein.com  

A:

He may be using Dysport, another effective brand of Botulinium which is mixed with that amount of Saline.  I'm sure he knows what he is doing.  You shouldn't worry.

A:

The dilution ration for Botox and similar products is largely a matter of personal preference.  The main factor in predicting the results is the total dose, measured in "units" which are a biological test and not a unit of weight.  Keep in mind that with other botulinum products such as Dysport, the units are different.

Richard A. Baxter, M.D. - View Other Answers by this Doctor
Mountlake Terrace, WA

A:

 The dilution of Botox is not important.  The amount of units of Botox (there are 100 per vial) is what is important.  For example, the frown lines usually require 20-25 units for pleasing results.  With a 1 cc dilution you receive less volume (0.2 cc) during your injection, whereas a dilution with 2.5 cc of saline will give you more volume (0.5 cc) but the same amount of units.  It is sometimes more accurate to use a higher dilution.

A:

Do not worry.  The dose of Botox injected is important, not the dilution factor.  For the area you are being treated for I may use 50 to 75 units of Botox.  As long as the doctor uses the same number of units as before, you should obtain  the same results.

A:

When most of us inject Botox, we know how many units we are placing in each injection point.  Personally, I also use 2.5cc to suspend the Botox because it is relatively concentrated so that I don't have to worry about the drug migrating where I don't want it to go.  Using only 1cc would be very concentrated and difficult for most people to control, so I don't think you have anything to worry about.

A:

The effect of Botox is the same using 1cc of saline or 2.5 cc as long as the amount of the units used is the same.  I wrote a blog on "everything you need to know about Botox injection."  Check our blog at www.ahnezami.com.

A. Hossein Nezami, M.D., J.D. - View Other Answers by this Doctor
Jacksonville, FL

A:

Botox will function according to the number of units that are injected.  If your doctor injects the same number of units you will get a similar result.  I have always used 2.5 cc's of saline for mixing Botox so to me this is normal.

Best Wishes

Dr. Peterson

Marcus L. Peterson, M.D., FACS - View Other Answers by this Doctor
St. George, UT

A:

Botox can be mixed with a variety of dilutions.  The important point is the physician knows how many units they want to place with each injection.  2.5 and 4 cc are standard dilutions and you will be fine.  If anything, you will be receiving less medication with the new dilution providing the same volume is injected. 

A:

A dilution with 2.5 cc's of saline is common.  The amount of dilutent should not concern you.  The number of units injected is what is most important as long as it is injected in the appropriate area.  Each large vial of Botox contains 100 units.

A:

I don't think you need to worry at all.  There are many different ways to dilut Botox and as long as the injector knows how many units you are getting (no matter how it is diluted), then you will be safe.  I have always used 2.5 cc dilution.  A little more volume is injected but I feel I have better control over the process as it is easier to deliver the exact number of units in the spots where I want them by using a little more volume that I get with this dilution technique.  As long as you receive the same number of units, your results should be exactly the same.

Scott A. Greenberg, M.D., FACS - View Other Answers by this Doctor
Winter Park, FL

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