Is fixing a deviated septum more complicated after a primary rhinoplasty?

Q:

Is it more difficult to correct a deviated septum after one has already had a rhinoplasty for aesthetic purposes to correct a nasal bump?

A:

 Normally the answer is NO. But, there are all kinds of deviated septums. Some are very severe, require adjuvant turbinate or sinus surgery. Please address your concerns with your nasal surgeon. I hope they are a member of the ASAPS. Best,

 

Gary R. Culbertson, MD, FACS

A:

If you had a closed rhinoplasty with dorsal hump reduction and possibly infractures, it is really no more difficult to perform a delayed septoplasty than if you never had any previous surgery.  (Although I'm surprised your surgeon didn't address this issue at the time of the rhinoplasty.)  If you had an open approach with a columellar strut, the septoplasty is just slightly more difficult to perform due to some existing scaring.  On the other hand, if you had previously had an aggressive septoplasty and later want to perform a reduction rhinoplasty, this scenario might be significantly complicated and could require utilization of a remote cartilage donor site.  

A:

Deviated Septum After Primary Rhinoplasty – Of course, one can do this as a secondary rhinoplasty procedure. This should be done by someone who is a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon or Otolaryngologist with experience and expertise in rhinoplasty as well as functional reconstruction of the nose.

A:

Is fixing a deviated septum more complicated after a primary rhinoplasty?

 

It is usually not, but it depends on your particular anatomy and what was done surgically on your nose previously. The best way to approach this is to have a consultation with a fully trained surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery who is ideally a member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) or an ENT doctor certified by the Board of Otolaryngology. The surgeon should have extensive experience in performing secondary nasal surgery.

 

Robert Singer, MD FACS

 

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