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What method is best to use for replacing my implants?

Q:

I had saline implants done in 1996. Placement was done through the armpits and they were placed under the muscle. I am starting to have puckering on the left breast. I would like to have them replaced with silicone. I am wondering if they can be replaced using the same method to avoid scars on my breasts? I am also wondering what a reasonable price is and if the method used affects the cost?

A:

Rebecca,

 

 An examination is absolutely necessary in your case. Please seek out an evaluation & examination expediently. Puckering or indentation of a female beast could be an sign/ symptom of Breast Cancer. Hopefully, this is not the case. Best,

 

Gary R Culbertson, MD, FACS

A:

Because of the puckering in one breast, you most likely need a capsulectomy when you exchange the implants. To do this requires better exposure than you can get  through the axilla. Additionally, the new cohesive gel silicone implants cannot  be inserted through the axilla without risk of tearing the shell of the implant. The two approaches to do this are the inframammory and periareolar. Because both approaches are similar, the cost will be the same.

A:

Thank you for your question.  While it is possible to replace or saline breast implants through the transaxillary incision, there may be good reasons to use the incision beneath the breast.  Next

 

That you have any evidence of capsular contraction, asymmetry or other problem with your current breast implants the surgeon may want the improved visibility that is possible through the inframammary crease incision.  In addition the risk of capsular contraction with gel implants is less through the inframammary crease approach.

http://drseckel.com/surgical-procedures/result-oriented-breast-augmentation-breast-enlargement/

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