Submit your question below about any cosmetic procedure to be considered for posting with an answer from one of our board-certified plastic surgeons.

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Note: ASAPS cannot give advice about specific medical problems nor should answers provided by responding surgeons be substituted for a complete medical history, work-up and an in-personal medical/surgical consultation. Sorry we can't answer all questions. We try to select questions that have the widest general interest.

Why would a surgeon refuse surgery?

Q:

Would a doctor refuse to do surgery if the patient wants the implant for her partner?

A:

The patient has to want any elective cosmetic procedure. The patient needs to understand the surgery and the potential risks and complications. Breast implants will need further surgery in the future for one reason or another. The motivation for elective cosmetic surgery should be the patient self motivation for bettering self image. It is a decision only the patient can make. Cosmetic surgery does not improve relationships, does not  mend broken relationships.

A:

Surgery should be carefully considered and is an incredibly personal decision when it is meant to improve self image.  Doing surgery for someone else may in fact lead to more conflict and dissatisfaction longterm.

A:

Yes. A patient should want to have any plastic surgery procedure for their own reasons and motivation of self enhancement. Pressure from a partner is the worst scenario and should not be done under any circumstances.

A:

Yes. A patient should want to have any plastic surgery procedure for their own reasons and motivation for self enhancement. Pressure from a partner is the worst scenario and should not be done under any circumstances.

A:

The plastic surgeons responsibility is to the patient and not the partner.  He would refuse surgery if the patient did not want breast surgery and so would I.  This is elective surgery and consents are a critical part of the process.  Good Luck.

A:

Patients who undergo elective, cosmetic (essentially unnecessary) surgery need to be 100% on board with the procedure. This includes anticipated results, potential complications and long term implications of the surgery. The decision to have a procedure needs to stem exclusively from the patient’s desires. Peer pressure or outside influences should not play a role in this process.

In any surgical procedure, the surgeon needs to be 100% the patient’s advocate in the decision making process and in the operative and perioperative care of the patient. If in the evaluation of a person’s suitability for a procedure, the surgeon feels that the patient has physical, medical or emotional conditions (such as unrealistic expectations or improper motivation) such that the patient would be unduly harmed by the surgery (psychologically or otherwise), then the surgeon, as the patient’s advocate, has a responsibility to refuse to do the procedure.

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